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Zach Trokey

Back-End Engineer
Pronouns he/him
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About me

I have always been a very curious knowledge seeker that has a passion to know how everything works. In past roles, I have always gone above and beyond my scope of duties to find more efficient ways of completing tasks. I enjoy taking things apart and looking at every detail of their inner workings. I’ve worked in the financial industry with a focus on risk management and have also held various leadership roles in construction where I managed teams and projects. Most recently I graduated from Turings Back End engineering program. There I learned the principles of object-oriented programming, how REST APIs work, and most importantly, how to learn new ideas and concepts quickly and independently. Moving forward, I aim to expand my knowledge of programming languages and principles and be a part of a company that is making a positive impact in the world.

When I'm not coding, you can find me hiking in Colorado's beautiful mountains, playing guitar, or learning to play piano.

Preferred locations

  • Boulder, CO
  • Fort Collins, CO
Open to other locations and/or remote work

Previous industries

  • Banking
  • Construction
  • Financial Services
  • Logistics and Supply Chain
  • Warehousing

Skills

  • Chrome
  • Continuous Integration
  • Git
  • GitHub
  • Google
  • Heroku
  • HTML5
  • LinkedIn
  • PostgreSQL
  • Rails
  • RSpec
  • Ruby
  • Slack
  • Travis
  • Visual Studio

Currently learning

  • C
  • C++
  • JavaScript
  • Python

Projects

Whether, Sweater

Whether, Sweater

Project scope time hours
Collaborators

Tools Used

  • GitHub
  • PostgreSQL
  • Rails
  • RSpec
  • Ruby

Whether, Sweater is an API that exposes multiple endpoints to meet the front-end team’s requirements to allow a user to register for an API key, login, and generate the current and forecasted weather based on travel time to a chosen destination. To achieve this, multiple calls needed to be made to the Mapquest API to calculate the driving directions, convert the user's input of city and state into coordinates, send the coordinates to the Open Weather API, and then process the data to get the weather forecast at the destination at the time of arrival. Webmock and VCR were used to limit the number of external API calls made during testing. Rails bcrypt was used to authenticate the user. API keys were generated for new users using Ruby's SecureRandom base64.

Code Repository
Screenshot detail for project Whether, Sweater
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Rails Engine

Rails Engine

Project scope time hours
Collaborators

Tools Used

  • GitHub
  • PostgreSQL
  • Rails
  • RSpec
  • Ruby

Rails Engine is an API that exposes multiple business intelligence endpoints and provides CRUD functionality. Serializers were utilized to format all JSON responses. Thorough testing was completed using RSpec, as well as Postman's built-in test suite. Throughout the project, advanced ActiveRecord queries are built to allow a user to retrieve information such as total revenue for a merchant, merchants with the most revenue, merchants with the most items sold, and potential revenue of unshipped invoices.

Code Repository
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Viewing Party

Viewing Party

Project scope time hours
Collaborators Profile picture for Joe Ray

Tools Used

  • GitHub
  • Heroku
  • PostgreSQL
  • Rails
  • Ruby
  • Travis

Viewing party is an application to explore movies from The Movie Database (TMDB) API and create viewing parties for a user and their friends. It requires basic authentication and includes self-referential database relationships for defining friendships. RuboCop was used to ensure that the codebase was clean, readable, and conformed to Ruby conventionality. TravisCI was used for continuous integration.

Launch the App Code Repository
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